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Rocket building with the whole family

June works on the family rocket.

June works on the family rocket.

At last year’s Northern Spark we were pleasantly surprised to see a lot of families with young children out and about at the festival. Lucky kids — they got to stay out way past bedtime.  This year we’ve made a few adjustments for family audiences, primarily a set of projects by the Minnesota Children’s Museum, Bell Museum of Natural History, and Public Art Saint Paul that will begin at 7 pm.
A lot of other festival projects are family friendly (check out a suggested list here) and at least one project is being made an artist-run family.  The Pezalla-Granlund crew is assembling a rocket as part of *astronaut spirit academy*— an array of  activities and objects set for space travel.
The Pezalla-Granlunds took time out of their rocket-building to answer a few questions about their process.
Let’s do a quick family introduction. Who are you? 
Tim – dad
Margaret – mom
Oskar – 11
June – 6
What are you making for the astronaut spirit academy? Does your rocket have a name? 
Hmmm, our project is called “Great Astonomical Discoveries (Nearly) Lately Made.” It would have been “Great Astronomical Discoveries Lately Made,” but our rocket took off without us. We’ll have some great images of the planet that we were about to be exploring, if not for the small problem with the rocket. We do have a telescope, however, so we should be able to spot a view of the rocket as it approaches the planet we were to have been visiting. We have lots of ideas about what it certainly probably would have looked like had we actually gone there.
What materials are you using?
June: Candy! And cookies! Toothpicks. Cups.
Oskar:  Ummmm… We’ve used wood, various food items, glue, toothpicks, straws, cans, Plastic cups,
Tim: plywood, plexiglass and astro-wrap.
Are there materials or structures you tried which work or those that didn’t work?
Oskar: The gum drops didn’t really work because they just drooped. The tic tacs were sort of hard to use because you couldn’t really attach them. The toothpicks were really effective because you could poke them through the cups and stuff.
June: My space girl didn’t work so well —  she kept drooping.
Do each of you have different jobs on the team or do you each do a little bit of everything?
June: We all do a little bit of everything. Bossed by me (says June).and daddy is building us a table.
Oskar: I think we do a little bit of everything. Making the buildings is my favorite job so far.
Four-legged help.

Four-legged help.

Thanks guys, and good luck! We’ll see you in space!